Army Researchers Work To Make Night Deadlier

It’s funny to think about science fiction and the modern military going hand-in-hand and being inspired by the other. Science fiction has it’s visions set in a future that is frequently dystopian and full of warfare, chaos, and technologies that aren’t even near to what we have today. That being said, Army researchers frequently find inspiration for technological breakthroughs in the words of science fiction authors. One of the most famous futuristic warriors is Predator, an alien who fights on a code of honor (unarmed means unharmed) and uses advanced technology, such as cloaking and infrared technology, to observe it’s enemies in both day and night. Night has always been one of humanities greatest fears, the dark can hold all sorts of enemies and the ability to see clearly in it is paramount for soldiers who are hunting enemies and trying to avoid civilian casualties.

Soldiers and Predators work in the same way: see a target, make sure it’s a target, eliminate target. This is obviously far more difficult when it’s dark out and frayed nerves are even further on edge, hence the need to comprehensive and accurate night vision and infrared technology. Using the Predator as a source of inspiration. scientists have been working to replicate the infrared technology it uses so effectively in the films to track and hunt prey. The Night Vision Electronics Sensors Directorate (NVESD) is the group in charge of inventing and implementing these new technologies and they have been doing a fantastic job. The current night vision/infrared technology is incredibly impressive, allowing soldiers to detect and locate threats far in advance of actual contact.

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